Menu  
about-us ceop ceop home home parents twitter log-in log in arrow sen children log-out key-information search search translate translate
Twitter
Twitter
Translate
Search
School Logo

Forest Town

Primary School

Belong, Aim High, Succeed

English

This week your daily English challenges are based on the short film ‘The Bridge’.

 

The bridge is too narrow for the animals to pass.  If they worked together, they could get past. However, the bear and the elk are too stubborn and mean to help each other.

The Bridge

Still image for this video

Monday 18th May 2020

 

Today, we will be exploring how the characters felt whilst on the bridge. We will be exploring these feelings or emotions as exclamation sentences using exclamation marks and questions using question marks.

 

Remember that exclamation sentences are used to show strong emotions and begin with the words ‘what’ or ‘how’. For example, ‘What big teeth you have!’

 

Questions begin with words like ‘who’, ‘what’, ‘when’, ‘where’, ‘why’, ‘can’, how’ and ‘do’. They end with a question mark. For example, ‘How will I get across the bridge?’

 

Look at the examples in picture 1 to show the features and structures of exclamation sentences and questions.

 

Read the exclamation sentences and questions carefully in picture 2 and then decide which character is thinking or feeling it (if it fits under more than one, you can place it between them both). You could just talk about the sentences with your adult, print them out and sort them or have a go at writing them with the correct animal.

 

Tuesday 19th May 2020 

 

Today you be imagining what the characters might be saying to each other. You will be acting out the story with an adult or sibling but you will have to include dialogue (what the characters are saying to each other).

 

For example, walk onto the bridge, opposite Moose and say “Oh! Excuse me Bear, I didn’t see you there.”

Bear – “I haven’t got time for this. Move out of the way Moose!”

Moose – “Stop pushing past me Bear!”

Bear – “Go back Moose. I want to get by! MOVE!”

 

Remember to show the character’s emotions in the way they speak? E.g. Bear is an angry character, Raccoon is quiet and polite and Rabbit is in a rush. 

Wednesday 20th May 2020

 

Today you are going to write down your dialogue using pictures 1 and 2 to help you. Fill in the speech bubbles using the dialogue you came up with yesterday. Remember to use capital letters, full stops and finger spaces when recording your speech. If you are drawing your own speech bubbles in your book, remember that it is easier to write first and then draw the speech bubble around your writing. If you struggle to think of some dialogue, there are some ideas to help you in picture 3.

 

 

Picture 3

Thursday 21st May 2020

 

This week we have looked at exclamation sentences and questions. Today we are going to be looking at statements and commands as well.

 

The weather is pleasant today. This is a statement. It tells you a fact.

 

Please may I pass you? This is a question. It asks for something and ends with a question mark.

 

What a ridiculous thing to do! This is an exclamation. It emphasises sudden feelings and ends with an exclamation mark.

 

Go back and wait for me to pass first. This is a command. It tells you to do something.

 

Read the sentences in the picture and decide if they are a question, exclamation sentence, statement or command. Write the correct word function next to each sentence.

 

 

Challenge - Have a go at writing your own sentence for each function. 

Friday 22nd May 2020

 

I have given you the start of a story ‘Bear’s Story’ based on the animation ‘The Bridge’. Today, I would like you to continue the story using what we have learnt this week. Don’t forget to use the success criteria.

 

Success Criteria

  • Capital letters
  • Finger spaces
  • Full stops
  • Write in the past tense
  • Write the story in the correct sequence
  • Characters feelings
  • Exclamation sentences, commands, questions and statements
  • Time sequencing words
  • Coordinating conjunctions - and, but, or
  • Subordinating conjunctions – when, that, if, because

 

 

 

Awards

 
Top